The Masters of Our Own Homes travelling exhibition at Daley Plaza in Chicago. The Chicago Picasso, an untitled monumental sculpture by Pablo Picasso, is in the background. Photo by Sten Hankewitz.

Gallery: Estonia’s travelling exhibition visits Chicago

Estonia’s travelling exhibition, Masters of Our Own Homes: Estonia at 100, opened in Chicago on 1 June at Daley plaza in front of the city hall.

The exhibition present Estonia, its innovative movements and solutions through the themes of history, culture, Estonians and innovation. The exhibition offers “both moments of recognition to Estonians living abroad as well as inspiration to the general public”, the organiser of the travelling exhibition, the Estonian Museum of Occupations and Freedom, said.

“Additionally, the exhibition aims to introduce Estonian design and services, invite to plan a vacation here, and seek career opportunities in Estonian companies.”

The exhibition, that stays open until 5 June at the very centre of the Windy City, is estimated to be seen by 300,000 people. It’s also accompanied by performances of Estonian folk dance groups and Estonian choirs.

The executive director of the Museum of Occupations and Freedom, Keiu Telve, said that the travelling exhibition has circled around North America. “Over one year, it’s been in four cities: Stanford, Toronto, Boston and Chicago, and seen by almost half a million people,” she said in a statement.

The exhibition covers over 500 square metres (5,382 square feet) and is 12 metres (40 feet) wide, four metres (13 feet) high, weighs four metric tonnes (8,818 pounds) and consists of 244 exhibition panels that each tell a tiny story of Estonia’s history.

The exhibition is supported by the Estonian ministry of culture and the Integration Foundation. The execution of the exhibition in Chicago was led by the Estonian cultural association in the city. 

Cover: The Masters of Our Own Homes travelling exhibition at Daley Plaza in Chicago. The Chicago Picasso, an untitled monumental sculpture by Pablo Picasso, is in the background. Photo by Sten Hankewitz.